Open Access Research

Closed–containment aquaculture in Atlantic Canada

Richard Apostle

Author Affiliations

Sociology and Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

Maritime Studies 2012, 11:13  doi:10.1186/2212-9790-11-13

Published: 31 October 2012

Abstract

This paper explores the development of a new type of aquaculture which is beginning to occupy a modest economic niche in contemporary food production. Just as open-cage production attracted considerable social science attention in the 1990s, closed-containment production is now being evaluated as a preferred alternative. Close-containment has been viewed as an approach which may, to some degree, address problems associated with the first wave of industrial aquaculture: disease, genetic modification, food waste and social externalities. As with the first wave of aquaculture development, the financial demands and energy requirements of this new system have restricted development to species which are suited to the new technologies, and command high enough market prices to justify their growth. Using information collected at four major, but different sites in Nova Scotia, this paper attempts to provide some initial comparative insights on an important new trend in contemporary aquaculture.